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Bayesian probability-based computer program rolls the dice on perovskite interfaces

Perovskites are a type of mineral and class of materials, and have been attracting a great deal of attention for their potential applications to technologies such as those used in solar cells. These unique materials have well-ordered structures and show many interesting properties that could be useful in other areas of electronics. Such a variety of properties in the same structural backbone allows different kinds of perovskites, with different properties, to be evenly joined together without breaking lattice coherency. Being able to examine the structures at these interfaces is important for researchers studying perovskites, but currently used techniques have insufficient resolution or produce complex results that are very difficult to analyze.

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Faster big-data analysis

A new system for creating code that manipulates tensors yields programs that are 100 times as efficient as those produced by existing software packages, with ramifications for big-data analysis and machine learning.

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CIOs And CTOs Must Understand How The Internet Of Things Is Changing How Business Is Done

The Internet of Things (IoT) is forcing telecom providers, enterprises and cloud providers to change their business models not to just thrive, but survive. Although not new, advances in interest, infrastructure and information have put IoT in a position to fundamentally change how business is done.

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How quantum materials may soon make Star Trek technology reality

If you think technologies from Star Trek seem far-fetched, think again. Many of the devices from the acclaimed television series are slowly becoming a reality. While we may not be teleporting people from starships to a planet’s surface anytime soon, we are getting closer to developing other tools essential for future space travel endeavours.

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China Just Unveiled The Most Futuristic Library Ever

China’s massive new library has such a sleek and futuristic design that it looks like it came straight out of the works of science fiction. The newly opened Tianjin Binhai Library situated at the Binhai Cultural Center covers an enormous 33,700 square meters (362,744 square feet) space. The library itself has about 1.2 million books …

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What Lies Beyond The Edge Of The Observable Universe?

You’ve probably read about how the Universe is expanding, and has been expanding since the beginning of time. Over the course of 13.8 billion years or so, it’s stretched from the size of a billionth of a proton to the vast, unknowable expanse it is today. In fact, recent research suggests that it’s actually expanding faster than our current laws of physics can explain, and that’s kind of a problem.

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Material could bring optical communication onto silicon chips

Ultrathin films of a semiconductor that emits and detects light can be stacked on top of silicon wafers, researchers report in a study that could help bring optical communication onto silicon chips.

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Dark matter: The mystery substance physics still can’t identify that makes up the majority of our universe

Cosmologists are heading back to their chalkboards as the experiments designed to figure out what this unknown 84 percent of our universe actually is come up empty.

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Newfound Wormhole Allows Information to Escape Black Holes | Quanta Magazine

Physicists theorize that a new “traversable” kind of wormhole could resolve a baffling paradox and rescue information that falls into black holes.

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Artificial intelligence finds 56 new gravitational lens candidates

A group of astronomers from the universities of Groningen, Naples and Bonn has developed a method that finds gravitational lenses in enormous piles of observations. The method is based on the same artificial intelligence algorithm that Google, Facebook and Tesla have been using in the last years. The researchers published their method and 56 new gravitational lens candidates in the November issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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World’s First Artificial Kidney Is All Set To Replace Dialysis in 2-3 Years. Here is how it works !

A team of university scientists has developed the world’s first artificial kidney technology to be implanted in the body. Their bio-hybrid approach uses living kidney cells in tandem with a series of specialized microchips powered by the human heart to filter waste from the blood stream. The National Kidney Foundation estimates that over 100,000 patients are on the waiting list for a donor kidney, and over 3,000 are added list each year. The average patient spends 3.6 years waiting for a viable transplant, and may be treated with dialysis while they wait, but only one in three dialysis patient survives

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teleSUR English

This is the mayor’s solution to feeding the hungry in Brazil’s megacity of São Paulo where long-term poverty as become the norm.

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Genetic Struggles Within Cells May Create New Species | Quanta Magazine

Mitonuclear conflict — a struggle between the genes in a cell’s nucleus and its mitochondria — might sometimes split species in two.

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World’s First Human Head Transplant Will Take Place in December

Last year, Dr. Sergio Canavero created quite the ruckus (to put it mildly) when he vowed to be the first person to transplant a human head onto a deceased donor’s body. Yes, he is planning on attempting the world’s first human head transplant (or body transplant, depending on how you look at it).

In fact, it has been about a year since his initial proclamation, and the Italian neurosurgeon still stands firm on his declaration, despite claims from other experts that it is nothing but a PR Stunt (at best) or a hoax. Some have even hypothesized it’s all just a plot meant to promote Metal Gear Solid.

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Six degrees of separation: Why it is a small world after all

It’s a small world after all – and now science has explained why. A study conducted by the University of Leicester and KU Leuven, Belgium, examined how small worlds emerge spontaneously in all kinds of networks, including neuronal and social networks, giving rise to the well-known phenomenon of “six degrees of separation”.

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How Chinese scientists used a supercomputer to solve the ancient puzzle called the Three Body Problem

Like the endlessly repeating patterns of chaos theory, the new solutions discovered by the Chinese researchers make for elaborate and weirdly beautiful images when they are plotted in two dimensions

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Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-rays

If brain imaging could be compared to Google Earth, neuroscientists would already have a pretty good “satellite view” of the brain, and a great “street view” of neuron details. But navigating how the brain computes is arguably where the action is, and neuroscience’s “navigational map view” has been a bit meager.

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Oil will crash to $10 a barrel with electric vehicle revolution, strategist says

Oil prices are poised to crash to just $10 per barrel over the next six to eight years as alternative energy fuels continue to attract more and more investors, Chris Watling, chief executive of Longview Economics, told CNBC on Friday.

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Do Neutrinos Explain Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry? | Quanta Magazine

A hint that neutrinos behave differently than antineutrinos suggests an answer to one the biggest questions in physics.