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A naked singularity: Can we spot the most extreme object in the universe?

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A team of scientists at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India, have found new ways to detect a bare or naked singularity, the most extreme object in the universe.

In such a case, we cannot see the singularity and we do not need to bother about its effects. An important question then is, how to observationally distinguish a naked singularity from a black hole. For the case, the rotating object is a black hole, while for the case, it is a naked singularity.

The TIFR team, namely, Dr. Chandrachur Chakraborty, Mr. Prashant Kocherlakota, Prof. Sudip Bhattacharyya and Prof. Pankaj Joshi, in collaboration with a Polish team comprising Dr. Mandar Patil and Prof. Andrzej Krolak, has in fact shown that the precession frequency of a gyroscope orbiting a black hole or a naked singularity is sensitive to the presence of an event horizon.

In the case of a naked singularity, the precession frequency becomes arbitrarily large only in the equatorial plane, but being regular in all other planes.

The TIFR team has also found that the precession of orbits of matter falling into a rotating black hole or a naked singularity can be used to distinguish these exotic objects.

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Article originally posted at pionic.org

Post Author: Carla Parsons

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