April 2015

Radical Science News added 3 new photos.

Here's the original FULL article of NASA's recent EM Drive tests, which actually confirms that the seemingly impossible propulsion system is fully operational and does not violate the law of Conservation of Momentum....

—http://bit.ly/1JEgrdH
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Heres the original FULL article of NASAs recent EM Drive tests, which actually confirms that the seemingly impossible propulsion system is fully operational and does not violate the law of Conservation of Momentum....

—http://bit.ly/1JEgrdH

Stunning flash simulation of cosmological models showing our current understanding of the universe as well as reality on a quantum scale....
—click on the [ bit.ly/1OJ84B1 ] link *****

—http://bit.ly/1OJ84B1
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Stunning flash simulation of cosmological models showing our current understanding of the universe as well as reality on a quantum scale....
—click on the [ http://bit.ly/1OJ84B1 ] link *****

—http://bit.ly/1OJ84B1

NASA's experimental thruster engine (EM DRIVE) ACTUALLY WORKS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
"..Nasa has been testing a highly controversial electromagnetic space propulsion technology called EmDrive and has found evidence that it may indeed work, and along the way, might even have made a sci-fi concept possible.
The EmDrive is a technology that could make it much cheaper to launch satellites into space and could be key to solving the energy crisis, if solar power could be harnessed off the satellites and sent back to Earth.
It was thought up and developed by a British scientist called Roger Shawyer, who spent years having his technology ridiculed by the international space community even though Boeing licensed it and the UK government was satisfied it worked..."

—http://bit.ly/1bGuYXQ
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NASAs experimental thruster engine (EM DRIVE) ACTUALLY WORKS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
..Nasa has been testing a highly controversial electromagnetic space propulsion technology called EmDrive and has found evidence that it may indeed work, and along the way, might even have made a sci-fi concept possible.
The EmDrive is a technology that could make it much cheaper to launch satellites into space and could be key to solving the energy crisis, if solar power could be harnessed off the satellites and sent back to Earth.
It was thought up and developed by a British scientist called Roger Shawyer, who spent years having his technology ridiculed by the international space community even though Boeing licensed it and the UK government was satisfied it worked...

—http://bit.ly/1bGuYXQ

Sebastian Ross, Mannix Villasica Galaura and 23 others like this

Radical Science NewsFor the people viewing this graphic...We apologize for the inaccuracy of the photo....This is actually an Ionic propulsion system (given the glowing blue ring, indicative of an Ion thruster)...This does not represent the EM Drive which is the main subject of the article...We will keep this photo up just as a reference point. We'll post another article with the correct corresponding photo to go along with it...Again, thanks and sorry for the inaccuracy......

2 years ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Peter SpriggsRobbie Flores It really needs to be given a lot more funding to be honest, hopefully these latest tests will give it the attention it sorely deserves. I mean seriously.... according to Shawyer it has the potential to send a craft to Alpha Centuri in 10 years,.. what else is there to say?.... Oh yeah... it would also be able to levitate 3 tons from 1kw of power....

2 years ago   ·  1
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Robbie FloresWTF are we waiting for then !?!?...

2 years ago   ·  1
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Andrew DavenportGoddamn someone please give this drive some funding!

2 years ago   ·  1
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Robbie FloresIts always about funding. This is why we can't have nice things. Lol

2 years ago
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Mannix Villasica Galauraany video please

12 months ago
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Why the LHC will (probably) not destroy the universe. ... See MoreSee Less

Radical Science News shared Prince Ea's video.

Prince Ea
Something to consider.......
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Dear Future Generations, Sorry. www.instagram.com/prince_ea/


Falcon 9: the rundown on this remarkable piece of engineering...

►http://www.spacex.com/falcon9
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Falcon 9: the rundown on this remarkable piece of engineering...

►http://www.spacex.com/falcon9

Sebastian Ross, Giorgi Grigolia and 3 others like this

Garrett SosaFalcon 9: the rundown on this remarkable piece of engineering...

2 years ago
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Let’s Celebrate the Man Who Conquered Polio

April 12 marks the 60th anniversary of the polio vaccine. The incredible story of Jonas Salk’s historic breakthrough deserves to be remembered—and it holds very relevant lessons for the world today.

There was a time not too long ago when polio was a scourge that crippled thousands of children all over the globe. The drive to find a cure was boosted in the U.S. with the founding of the March of Dimes by President Franklin Roosevelt. Children collected coins to fund polio vaccine research and ultimately the Salk vaccine. In a single year alone, 80 million people donated to the program.

Massive field trials were organized to ensure Dr. Salk’s vaccine was safe and effective, and when the vaccine was formally introduced, hundreds of thousands of volunteers helped to set up vaccination clinics. This remains the biggest American peacetime volunteer effort to date.

Dr. Salk became a national hero, his generosity and compassion legendary. When asked why he chose to not patent his polio vaccine, forgoing a personal fortune, Dr. Salk famously replied, “Could you patent the sun?”

Remember, none of this had ever been done before. It was a grand experiment and it remains a powerful reminder that we should be thinking ambitiously when it comes to taking care of one another. If we were to act today with that same imagination, we could finally wipe out polio for good: Only three countries remain, and that number could be just two by this time next year, thanks to progress in Nigeria.
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Let’s Celebrate the Man Who Conquered Polio April 12 marks the 60th anniversary of the polio vaccine. The incredible story of Jonas Salk’s historic breakthrough deserves to be remembered—and it...

Let’s Celebrate the Man Who Conquered Polio

April 12 marks the 60th anniversary of the polio vaccine. The incredible story of Jonas Salk’s historic breakthrough deserves to be remembered—and it holds very relevant lessons for the world today.

There was a time not too long ago when polio was a scourge that crippled thousands of children all over the globe. The drive to find a cure was boosted in the U.S. with the founding of the March of Dimes by President Franklin Roosevelt. Children collected coins to fund polio vaccine research and ultimately the Salk vaccine. In a single year alone, 80 million people donated to the program.

Massive field trials were organized to ensure Dr. Salk’s vaccine was safe and effective, and when the vaccine was formally introduced, hundreds of thousands of volunteers helped to set up vaccination clinics. This remains the biggest American peacetime volunteer effort to date.

Dr. Salk became a national hero, his generosity and compassion legendary. When asked why he chose to not patent his polio vaccine, forgoing a personal fortune, Dr. Salk famously replied, “Could you patent the sun?”

Remember, none of this had ever been done before. It was a grand experiment and it remains a powerful reminder that we should be thinking ambitiously when it comes to taking care of one another. If we were to act today with that same imagination, we could finally wipe out polio for good: Only three countries remain, and that number could be just two by this time next year, thanks to progress in Nigeria.

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Alfred Nobel

In 1888, Nobel was astonished to read his own obituary, titled The merchant of death is dead, in a French newspaper. As it was Alfred's brother Ludvig who had died, the obituary was eight years premature. The article disconcerted Nobel and made him apprehensive about how he would be remembered. This inspired him to change his will to seek a change in public opinion, which led to his decision to establish the Nobel Prizes.

Alfred Bernhard Nobel (/noʊˈbɛl/; Swedish: [ˈalfrɛd nʊˈbɛl] About this sound listen (help·info); 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator, and armaments manufacturer.

He was the inventor of dynamite. Nobel also owned Bofors, which he had redirected from its previous role as primarily an iron and steel producer to a major manufacturer of cannon and other armaments. Nobel held 350 different patents, dynamite being the most famous. His fortune was used posthumously to institute the Nobel Prizes. The synthetic element nobelium was named after him. His name also survives in modern-day companies such as Dynamit Nobel and AkzoNobel, which are descendants of mergers with companies Nobel himself established.
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Alfred Nobel In 1888, Nobel was astonished to read his own obituary, titled The merchant of death is dead, in a French newspaper. As it was Alfred's brother Ludvig who had died, the obituary was eigh...

Alfred Nobel

In 1888, Nobel was astonished to read his own obituary, titled The merchant of death is dead, in a French newspaper. As it was Alfreds brother Ludvig who had died, the obituary was eight years premature. The article disconcerted Nobel and made him apprehensive about how he would be remembered. This inspired him to change his will to seek a change in public opinion, which led to his decision to establish the Nobel Prizes.

Alfred Bernhard Nobel (/noʊˈbɛl/; Swedish: [ˈalfrɛd nʊˈbɛl] About this sound listen (help·info); 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator, and armaments manufacturer.

He was the inventor of dynamite. Nobel also owned Bofors, which he had redirected from its previous role as primarily an iron and steel producer to a major manufacturer of cannon and other armaments. Nobel held 350 different patents, dynamite being the most famous. His fortune was used posthumously to institute the Nobel Prizes. The synthetic element nobelium was named after him. His name also survives in modern-day companies such as Dynamit Nobel and AkzoNobel, which are descendants of mergers with companies Nobel himself established.