January 2015 part 1

Radical Science News shared Science Channel's video.

Science Channel
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MUST WATCH VIDEO: This is how a living, beating heart is grown from stem cells. Learn more in TONIGHT'S PREMIERE of "Stem Cell Universe with Stephen Hawking" 10/9c.

Lynn M. Perry, Drew Samedi and 23 others like this

Filomena FigueiredoGreat.

3 years ago
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Arin SikdarGreat work..........

3 years ago
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THANKS GUYS !!! ... See MoreSee Less

THANKS GUYS !!!

Stars and Dust in Corona Australis
Image Credit & Copyright: CHART32 Team, Processing - Johannes Schedler

Explanation: Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic blue color as light from the region's young hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At the left, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region.

APOD Talk: Friday, January 9 in New York City
Tomorrow's picture: In the Arms of NGC 1097
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Stars and Dust in Corona Australis 
Image Credit & Copyright: CHART32 Team, Processing - Johannes Schedler

Explanation: Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic blue color as light from the regions young hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At the left, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region.

APOD Talk: Friday, January 9 in New York City
Tomorrows picture: In the Arms of NGC 1097

Sebastian Ross, Garrett Sosa and 9 others like this

Garrett SosaVery cool.

2 years ago
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"...Plath's team further discovered that the stages of reprogramming to iPSC are different from what was expected. They found that it is not simply the reversed sequence of stages of embryo development. Some steps are reversed in the expected order; others do not actually happen in the exact reverse order and resist a change until late during reprogramming to iPSCs..."

"This reflects how cells do not like to change from one specialized cell type to another and resist a change in cell identity," said Pasque. "Resistance to reprogramming also helps to explain why reprogramming takes place only in a very small proportion of the starting cells."

Read further by clicking on this link:
►http://bit.ly/14lErAa
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...Plaths team further discovered that the stages of reprogramming to iPSC are different from what was expected. They found that it is not simply the reversed sequence of stages of embryo development. Some steps are reversed in the expected order; others do not actually happen in the exact reverse order and resist a change until late during reprogramming to iPSCs...

This reflects how cells do not like to change from one specialized cell type to another and resist a change in cell identity, said Pasque. Resistance to reprogramming also helps to explain why reprogramming takes place only in a very small proportion of the starting cells.

Read further by clicking on this link:
►http://bit.ly/14lErAa

Radical Science News shared Discover Magazine's photo.

Astronomers have identified 8 new planets that orbit stars within the habitable zone — where temperatures are just right for llife: bit.ly/1HGOY7D
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Astronomers have identified 8 new planets that orbit stars within the habitable zone — where temperatures are just right for llife: http://bit.ly/1HGOY7D

This eye-catching photo of a futuristic metallic sphere won the people’s choice award in a recent photo competition hosted by Canada’s national particle and nuclear physics laboratory. Back in October this lab, also known as TRIUMF, invited Vancouver-based photographers into the facility to take snaps of what they encountered to then be judged in a range of categories. Scooping the people’s choice award, this photo by Margo Dornan shows the DESCANT neutron detector, a piece of equipment used in a couple of the experiments at TRIUMF.

►images here: www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/december-2014/triumf-announces-photo-contest-winners

Image courtesy: Margo Dornan / Physics World / Symmetry Magazine
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This eye-catching photo of a futuristic metallic sphere won the people’s choice award in a recent photo competition hosted by Canada’s national particle and nuclear physics laboratory. Back in October this lab, also known as TRIUMF, invited Vancouver-based photographers into the facility to take snaps of what they encountered to then be judged in a range of categories. Scooping the people’s choice award, this photo by Margo Dornan shows the DESCANT neutron detector, a piece of equipment used in a couple of the experiments at TRIUMF. 

►images here: http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/december-2014/triumf-announces-photo-contest-winners

 Image courtesy: Margo Dornan / Physics World / Symmetry Magazine

Good illustration of prebiotic molecules, simple sugars, alcohols, and water: all the elements found in interstellar space, which gives rise to the emergence of life on thermodynamically stable (habitable) planets....

►http://ow.ly/HtQSg
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Good illustration of prebiotic molecules, simple sugars, alcohols, and water: all the elements found in interstellar space, which gives rise to the emergence of life on thermodynamically stable (habitable) planets....

►http://ow.ly/HtQSg

Radical Science News shared Galactic Public Archives's photo.

Dr. Ken Hayworth on "Consciousness and the Self " (with references to Thomas Metzinger and Daniel Kolak)

Advances in cognitive science and neuroscience in the 20th century lead to a revitalization of philosophical and scientific debates on consciousness and the self. But for all the skirmishes between ‘dualists’ and ‘physicalists,’ and despite disputes about ‘philosophical zombies,’ these core existential questions remained mostly academic, irrelevant to the day-to-day lives of most of the Earth’s population. But if one existed in a world in which brains could be built, minds could be uploaded and memories could be preserved, would these questions seem so abstract?

In this film Dr. Ken Hayworth envisions a future that will increasingly prompt individuals to reassess their understanding of elements of daily life that are as rudimentary as “I” and “You.” What might be the implications of such a challenge, both in terms of how we view ourselves and in how we treat one another?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU9D0AlSRb8
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Follow the link here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU9D0AlSRb8

Dr. Ken Hayworth on Consciousness and the Self  (with references to Thomas Metzinger and Daniel Kolak)

Advances in cognitive science and neuroscience in the 20th century lead to a revitalization of philosophical and scientific debates on consciousness and the self. But for all the skirmishes between ‘dualists’ and ‘physicalists,’ and despite disputes about ‘philosophical zombies,’ these core existential questions remained mostly academic, irrelevant to the day-to-day lives of most of the Earth’s population. But if one existed in a world in which brains could be built, minds could be uploaded and memories could be preserved, would these questions seem so abstract?

In this film Dr. Ken Hayworth envisions a future that will increasingly prompt individuals to reassess their understanding of elements of daily life that are as rudimentary as “I” and “You.” What might be the implications of such a challenge, both in terms of how we view ourselves and in how we treat one another?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU9D0AlSRb8

Radical Science News shared Mashable's video.

Mashable
Human ingenuity....
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Your daily zen: 14 oddly satisfying things that will give you instant gratification.

Radical Science News shared A Mighty Girl's photo.

Girl Power.
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The artist Hydrogene has added six new works to her incredible series of minimalist artwork honoring famous women scientists. In addition to the original six posters featuring Jane Goodall, Grace Hopp...

Girl Power.