May 2014 part 3


Neutron Stars Tear Each Other To Shreds, Black Hole Ensues | Visualization
Two Intertwining Neutron Stars

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In this simulation, 2 neutron stars weigh in at 1.4 and 1.7 solar masses and are separated by only 11 miles. Intense tidal forces pull the stars apart as they spiral towards each other and the black h...

Article highlighting World Renowned Astrophysicist, Neil DeGrasse Tyson's new role in FOX's special series, COSMOS

read the article here:

parade.condenast.com/250591/lynnsherr/cosmos-neil-degrasse-tyson-transforming-how-we-think-about-...
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Article highlighting World Renowned Astrophysicist, Neil DeGrasse Tysons new role in FOXs special series, COSMOS 

read the article here:

http://parade.condenast.com/250591/lynnsherr/cosmos-neil-degrasse-tyson-transforming-how-we-think-about-science/

Radical Science News shared Eternal Life Fan Club's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Aubrey de Grey is a hero. #SENS Research Foundation For the full interview: is.gd/eoagOY Even if curing aging caused a multitude of other problems, it would still be worth it because almost a...

Radical Science News with Akash and 3 others.

*** Radical Science News ***

Links to the stories found in this graphic can be found here:

meteor shower >>> www.space.com/26006-meteor-shower-photos-may-camelopardalids-comet.html

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Broadband >>>> www.osa.org/en-us/about_osa/newsroom/news_releases/2014/first_broadband_wireless_connection%E2%80...

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Graphene >>>> phys.org/news/2014-05-graphene-type-material.html

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matter from light >>>>> www.redorbit.com/news/science/1113149146/decades-old-theory-light-into-matter-proven-051914/#FOd0...

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nanobots >>>> motherboard.vice.com/read/dna-nanobots-can-fool-the-immune-system-by-disguising-themselves-as-vir...

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Solar Jet fuel >>>> www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/2014/05/solar-jet-fuel-made-out-thin-air

More stories like these can be found on Radical Science News:
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Radical Science News shared New Scientist's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Futuristic planes with glowing wings, super-efficient wind turbines, greener cars… can a coat of ionised gas deliver all this magic? The full story takes wing at ow.ly/x3JBW

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Radical Science News shared ScienceAlert's photo.

hahaha
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We couldn't make this stuff up if we tried: French beekeepers were shocked to find their bees had produced a supply of thick, blue honey. Turns out the bees had been feeding on the colourful shells of...

hahaha

What exactly is a supernova? It’s a catastrophic event in the life of a star.

The full details are very complex, but basically supernovae are the visible signs of the deaths of stars more massive than the Sun. As with all other stars, massive stars spend most of their lives fusing hydrogen gas into helium in their cores. This results in a buildup of “ash” (end product of fusion reactions) in the core that eventually chokes off the hydrogen fuel from the hottest area of the core. With no new fuel, there is less energy being produced to counter the gravity trying to squeeze the star’s huge mass more tightly together. The result is that the star’s core begins to collapse as gravity overtakes the outward pressure. This results in heating the core—eventually enough that the ash can begin fusing into heavier molecules, initially carbon and oxygen. The cycle repeats, each time beginning and ending with different products and creating the next fuel source. Eventually, the core contains iron. Iron cannot liberate energy from fusion, so at this point, energy generation in the core suddenly stops, and the full mass of the star comes crashing down and a shock wave rips the star apart. This explosion is called a Type II supernova and results in the formation of a neutron star (or more rarely a black hole).

In 1987, a Type II supernova known as supernova 1987A occurred in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This was the last supernova that could be seen with the naked eye, but only from the southern hemisphere. In the year 1054, another naked-eye supernova was observed in the constellation of Taurus. This supernova, also Type II, not only created a neutron star but also left behind a visible remnant of expanding debris known as the Crab Nebula.

There are several kinds of Type I supernovae. Type Ia supernovae are a different, but related, phenomenon. In a Type Ia supernova, two stars are orbiting each other. One star is a little more massive than the Sun and has halted its fusion reactions and left only its core behind, so is a “dead” star in that sense. This is known as a white dwarf. It orbits a normal star closely enough that mass falls from the living star and is collected on the surface of the white dwarf. This particular kind of white dwarf is massive for its type and near a critical mass. The typical model proposes that when enough matter is collected from the living companion, a runaway set of nuclear reactions occurs that blows the white dwarf apart. Once again, this collapse gives off lots of energy and drastically brightens the system. Johannes Kepler observed a Type Ia supernova in our galaxy in 1604.

Type Ib and Ic supernovae are actually more similar to Type II supernovae in that they are believed to be “core collapse” supernovae. The difference is that they originate from extremely massive stars that have lost most of their outer hydrogen envelope and so have differing spectra.

In any case, the result is that a star that was typically invisible (or barely visible) from here becomes obviously visible. The word “supernova” draws its meaning from “nova”, which means “new star”. Supernovae are very rare in a given galaxy, but over the scope of all known galaxies, they can be observed several times a year. Usually, these require moderate to large telescopes to see because their parent galaxies are often very distant and therefore faint. The supernovae are often more luminous than the galaxies themselves. However, the brightness of a supernova is temporary and fades rather quickly into obscurity.

[Jeff Bryant]
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What exactly is a supernova? It’s a catastrophic event in the life of a star.

The full details are very complex, but basically supernovae are the visible signs of the deaths of stars more massive than the Sun. As with all other stars, massive stars spend most of their lives fusing hydrogen gas into helium in their cores. This results in a buildup of “ash” (end product of fusion reactions) in the core that eventually chokes off the hydrogen fuel from the hottest area of the core. With no new fuel, there is less energy being produced to counter the gravity trying to squeeze the star’s huge mass more tightly together. The result is that the star’s core begins to collapse as gravity overtakes the outward pressure. This results in heating the core—eventually enough that the ash can begin fusing into heavier molecules, initially carbon and oxygen. The cycle repeats, each time beginning and ending with different products and creating the next fuel source. Eventually, the core contains iron. Iron cannot liberate energy from fusion, so at this point, energy generation in the core suddenly stops, and the full mass of the star comes crashing down and a shock wave rips the star apart. This explosion is called a Type II supernova and results in the formation of a neutron star (or more rarely a black hole).

In 1987, a Type II supernova known as supernova 1987A occurred in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This was the last supernova that could be seen with the naked eye, but only from the southern hemisphere. In the year 1054, another naked-eye supernova was observed in the constellation of Taurus. This supernova, also Type II, not only created a neutron star but also left behind a visible remnant of expanding debris known as the Crab Nebula.

There are several kinds of Type I supernovae. Type Ia supernovae are a different, but related, phenomenon. In a Type Ia supernova, two stars are orbiting each other. One star is a little more massive than the Sun and has halted its fusion reactions and left only its core behind, so is a “dead” star in that sense. This is known as a white dwarf. It orbits a normal star closely enough that mass falls from the living star and is collected on the surface of the white dwarf. This particular kind of white dwarf is massive for its type and near a critical mass. The typical model proposes that when enough matter is collected from the living companion, a runaway set of nuclear reactions occurs that blows the white dwarf apart. Once again, this collapse gives off lots of energy and drastically brightens the system. Johannes Kepler observed a Type Ia supernova in our galaxy in 1604.

Type Ib and Ic supernovae are actually more similar to Type II supernovae in that they are believed to be “core collapse” supernovae. The difference is that they originate from extremely massive stars that have lost most of their outer hydrogen envelope and so have differing spectra.

In any case, the result is that a star that was typically invisible (or barely visible) from here becomes obviously visible. The word “supernova” draws its meaning from “nova”, which means “new star”. Supernovae are very rare in a given galaxy, but over the scope of all known galaxies, they can be observed several times a year. Usually, these require moderate to large telescopes to see because their parent galaxies are often very distant and therefore faint. The supernovae are often more luminous than the galaxies themselves. However, the brightness of a supernova is temporary and fades rather quickly into obscurity.

[Jeff Bryant]

Radical Science News shared Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

You may think you know what a jet is, but for particle physicists, the word has a completely different meaning. www.fnal.gov/pub/today/archive/archive_2014/today14-05-30.html

Radical Science News with Felix Cheshire Thompson and 3 others.

*** This Week in Radical Science ****

Click on one of the following links, displayed on this graphic

Artificial Blood >>> phys.org/news/2014-05-scientists-3d-artificial-blood-vessels.html

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Robotic Skin >>> phys.org/news/2014-05-scientists-electronic-skin.html

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Quantum Teleportation >>> www.iflscience.com/physics/scientists-achieve-quantum-teleportation

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Laser Regeneration >>>> www.businessinsider.com/laser-stem-cell-tooth-tissue-regeneration-2014-5

Stories like this and more on radcial science news:

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YES - YES - and YES - Solar Raodways: here's a GOOD explanation of what they are, along with there benefits...please watch...tell a friend....THIS NEEDS TO HAPPEN !!!!

youtu.be/qlTA3rnpgzU
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It's the roadway of the future! Feel inspired? Help us bring this project to the next step: www.indiegogo.com/projects/solar-roadways#home Check out ...

Radical Science News shared a link.

Take A Look Inside Your Brain As It Works In Real Time
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Scientists at the University of California have developed a system to map a 3D version of brain activity. The coolest part? People in the study could watch their brain working in real time.

"Only when we see ourselves in our true human context, as members of a race which is intended to be one organism and ‘one body,’ will we begin to understand the positive importance not only of the successes but of the failures and accidents in our lives. My successes are not my own. The way to them was prepared by others. The fruit of my labors is not my own: for I am preparing the way for the achievements of another. Nor are my failures my own. They may spring from failure of another, but they are also compensated for by another’s achievement. Therefore the meaning of my life is seen only in the complete integration of my achievements and failures with the achievements and failures of my own generation, and society, and time." -Thomas Merton - No Man is an Island ... See MoreSee Less

Radical Science News shared Hundung Sanasam's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Banach–Tarski paradox The Banach–Tarski paradox is a theorem in set-theoretic geometry, which states that given a solid ball in 3‑dimensional space, there exists a decomposition of the ball int...

Radical Science News shared Bill Gates's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Sea Kale anyone? Interesting approach to producing more food with less — Saltwater farms: b-gat.es/1pgJkCD

Radical Science News shared ENGINEERING.com's photo.

Have been waiting for this announcement for some time now.
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Google unveils a fully functioning prototype of its driverless car. Will consumers be quick to adopt the tech? VIDEO: ow.ly/xrvCm

Have been waiting for this announcement for some time now.

Radical Science News shared Engineers World's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Solar Energy Orb -- German architect Andre Broessel wants to "squeeze more juice out of the sun," so he designed this spherical solar panel to double the amount of energy captured by conventional pane...

Radical Science News shared Engineers World's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that it’s possible to beam a wireless Internet signal across the 384,472 km separating the Earth from the Moon. So... who’s got the password? Read...

Radical Science News added 3 new photos.

The Dragon spacecraft, designed to carry people into Earth's orbit, received a few upgrades as SpaceX refines its vehicle in partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. Today, SpaceX revealed these changes as it unveiled the Dragon V2 at the company's Hawthorne, California, headquarters.

Vehicle upgrades include solar arrays that will be affixed to the side of the spacecraft's trunk instead of on fold-out wings and a new launch escape system that will allow crew members to escape an anomaly at any point during flight. The vehicle is intended to ferry seven astronauts, along with critical cargo and supplies.

Other upgrades include larger windows, a larger hatch, and a redesigned outer mold line, which could make the trip more comfortable for passengers destined for orbit.

SpaceX is one of NASA's commercial partners working to develop a new generation of U.S. spacecraft and rockets capable of transporting humans to and from Earth's orbit from American soil. Ultimately, NASA intends to use such commercial systems to fly U.S. astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

[courtesy of NASA fanpage]
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The Dragon spacecraft, designed to carry people into Earths orbit, received a few upgrades as SpaceX refines its vehicle in partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. Today, SpaceX revealed these changes as it unveiled the Dragon V2 at the companys Hawthorne, California, headquarters.

Vehicle upgrades include solar arrays that will be affixed to the side of the spacecrafts trunk instead of on fold-out wings and a new launch escape system that will allow crew members to escape an anomaly at any point during flight. The vehicle is intended to ferry seven astronauts, along with critical cargo and supplies.

Other upgrades include larger windows, a larger hatch, and a redesigned outer mold line, which could make the trip more comfortable for passengers destined for orbit.

SpaceX is one of NASAs commercial partners working to develop a new generation of U.S. spacecraft and rockets capable of transporting humans to and from Earths orbit from American soil. Ultimately, NASA intends to use such commercial systems to fly U.S. astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

[courtesy of NASA fanpage]

Just sharing this because this is still something we really really need to REMEMBER. ... See MoreSee Less

Just sharing this because this is still something we really really need to REMEMBER.

Radical Science News shared Physics Today's post. ... See MoreSee Less

It's the birthday of Hannes Alfvén, who was born in 1908 in Norrköping, Sweden. Alfvén studied physics at the University of Uppsala. His subsequent research tackled the problem of how plasma, which...

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Pixie Dust is a new display technology that uses sound waves to levitate tiny particles that are then arranged into images and animations. Imagine these floating particles suddenly coming together to ...

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#ThrowbackFacts: Albert Einstein teaching a physics class at Lincoln University (HBCU in Pennsylvania) in 1946. The Nobel prize winning scientist said: "The separation of the races is not a disease of...