Post Thumb

‘Brain-on-a-chip’ tests effects of biological and chemical agents, develop countermeasures

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers have developed a “brain-on-a-chip” device aimed at testing and predicting the effects of biological and chemical agents, disease or pharmaceutical drugs on the brain over time without the need

Post Thumb

For The First Time Ever Scientists Have Boosted Human Memory With a Brain Implant

With everyone from Elon Musk to MIT to the US Department of Defense researching brain implants, it seems only a matter of time before such devices are ready to help humans extend their natural capabilities.

Post Thumb

Toward optical quantum computing

MIT researchers’ new silicon photonic-crystal design, which enables photon-photon interactions at room temperature, could point the way toward all-optical quantum computing.

Post Thumb

A high-performance, low-energy artificial synapse for neural network computing

For all the improvements in computer technology over the years, we still struggle to recreate the low-energy, elegant processing of the human brain. Now, researchers at Stanford University and Sandia National Laboratories have made an advance that could help computers mimic one piece of the brain’s efficient design – an artificial version of the space over which neurons communicate, called a synapse.

Post Thumb

Researchers develop new method for scaling up quantum devices

(Phys.org)-When it comes to fabricating complex quantum devices, one limitation is the number of wires available on the measurement systems that the quantum devices are built on. Typically, controlling just three or four quantum dots requires about 20 wires, which is the limit of many systems. In a new study, engineers have devised a method that in principle can control 14 quantum dots using 19 wires. This improvement provides a way to build larger arrays of quantum devices, which could be useful for scaling up quantum computers and quantum information processing systems.

Post Thumb

Breakthrough in flexible electronics enabled by inorganic-based laser lift-off

Flexible electronics have been touted as the next generation in electronics in various areas, ranging from consumer electronics to bio-integrated medical devices. In spite of their merits, insufficient performance of organic materials arising from inherent material properties and processing limitations in scalability have posed big challenges to developing all-in-one flexible electronics systems in which display, processor, memory, and energy devices are integrated. The high temperature processes, essential for high performance electronic devices, have severely restricted the development of flexible electronics because of the fundamental thermal instabilities of polymer materials.