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How AI Is Transforming Drug Creation

Pharmaceutical companies hope computers can help them find new medications that are faster, cheaper-and more likely to be effective.

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A Silicon Valley scientist and entrepreneur who invented a drug to explode double chins is now working on a cure for aging

Nathaniel David’s father began suffering from the symptoms of early-onset osteoarthritis in his back during his teenage years. The 77-year-old is now stooped over, effectively crippled, and unable to move. David started feeling muscle tightness in his back two years ago, at age 47.  An MRI confirmed what he knew was his likely genetic fate: He…

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The Fake Drug Industry Is Exploding, and We Can’t Do Anything About It

A fractured regulatory system hampered by Big Pharma’s meddling has led to a growing global falsification market.

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Targeted drug delivery with these nanoparticles can make medicines more effective

Nanoparticles disguised as human platelets could greatly enhance the healing power of drug treatments for cardiovascular disease and systemic bacterial infections. These platelet-mimicking nanoparticles, developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are capable of delivering drugs to targeted sites in the body-particularly injured blood vessels, as well as organs infected by harmful bacteria. Engineers demonstrated that by delivering the drugs just to the areas where the drugs were needed, these platelet copycats greatly increased the therapeutic effects of drugs that were administered to diseased rats and mice.

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Are We About to Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier, and Transform Medicine?

One of the greatest frustrations for doctors dealing with brain tumors is called the blood brain barrier (BBB). It's the defense our bodies have created to keep toxins from passing from our blood into our brains – but it also stops medicines from making the crossing too. Now that may be about to change.

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Computation leads to better understanding of influenza virus replication

Treating influenza relies on drugs such as Amantadine that are becoming less and less effective due to viral evolution. But University of Chicago scientists have published computational results that may give drug designers the insight they need to develop the next generation of effective influenza treatment.