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Designing New Metal Alloys Using Engineered Nanostructures

Stony Brook assistant professor Jason Trelewicz uses the electron microscopy and computing resources at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials to characterize nanoscale structures in metals mixed with other elements. The goal of his research is to achieve unprecedented properties in classical materials for use in everything from aerospace and automotive components to consumer electronics and nuclear reactors.

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How quantum materials may soon make Star Trek technology reality

If you think technologies from Star Trek seem far-fetched, think again. Many of the devices from the acclaimed television series are slowly becoming a reality. While we may not be teleporting people from starships to a planet’s surface anytime soon, we are getting closer to developing other tools essential for future space travel endeavours.

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Material could bring optical communication onto silicon chips

Ultrathin films of a semiconductor that emits and detects light can be stacked on top of silicon wafers, researchers report in a study that could help bring optical communication onto silicon chips.

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New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

It’s possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF researcher Yang Yang has come up with a new hybrid nanomaterial that harnesses solar energy and uses it to generate hydrogen from seawater more cheaply and efficiently than current materials.

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A new way to print electrical circuits – Northwestern Now

Within 15 minutes of meeting Mark Hersam, PhD, a renowned nanotechnology expert and professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University, Ethan Secor knew he wanted to work with him. Secor, a fifth year materials science and engineering PhD candidate, didn’t have a project in mi…

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Electron orbitals may hold key to unifying concept of high-temperature superconductivity

A team of scientists has found evidence for a new type of electron pairing that may broaden the search for new high-temperature superconductors. The findings, described in the journal Science, provide the basis for a unifying description of how radically different “parent” materials-insulating copper-based compounds and metallic iron-based compounds-can develop the ability to carry electrical current with no resistance at strikingly high temperatures.

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Majorana fermions predicted in a superconducting material

MIT physicists propose that a class of superconducting materials can host Majorana fermions near absolute zero, and that their existence can be verified using nuclear magnetic resonance.

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Solar cell mystery solved, expected to greatly increase efficiency

(Phys.org)-For the past 17 years, spiro-OMeTAD, has been keeping a secret. Despite intense research efforts, its performance as the most commonly used hole-transporting material in perovskite and dye-sensitized solar cells has remained stagnant, creating a major bottleneck for improving solar cell efficiency. Thinking that the material has given all it has to offer, many researchers have begun investigating alternative materials to replace spiro-OMeTAD in future solar cells.

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A new dimension to high-temperature superconductivity discovered

A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material’s electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity.

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Chemical complexity promises improved structural alloys for next-gen nuclear energy

Designing alloys to withstand extreme environments is a fundamental challenge for materials scientists. Energy from radiation can create imperfections in alloys, so researchers in an Energy Frontier Research Center led by the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating ways to design structural materials that develop fewer, smaller flaws under irradiation. The key, they report in the journal Nature Communications, is exploiting the complexity that is present when alloys are made with equal amounts of up to four different metallic elements.

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SLAC’s ultrafast ‘electron camera’ visualizes ripples in 2-D material

New research led by scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University shows how individual atoms move in trillionths of a second to form wrinkles on a three-atom-thick material. Revealed by a brand new “electron camera,” one of the world’s speediest, this unprecedented level of detail could guide researchers in the development of efficient solar cells, fast and flexible electronics and high-performance chemical catalysts.

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SLAC's ultrafast 'electron camera' visualizes ripples in 2-D material

New research led by scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University shows how individual atoms move in trillionths of a second to form wrinkles on a three-atom-thick material. Revealed by a brand new “electron camera,” one of the world’s speediest, this unprecedented level of detail could guide researchers in the development of efficient solar cells, fast and flexible electronics and high-performance chemical catalysts.

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A new tool measures the distance between phonon collisions

Today’s computer chips pack billions of tiny transistors onto a plate of silicon within the width of a fingernail. Each transistor, just tens of nanometers wide, acts as a switch that, in concert with others, carries out a computer’s computations. As dense forests of transistors signal back and forth, they give off heat-which can fry the electronics, if a chip gets too hot.

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New technique moves researchers closer to new range of GaN biosensors

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a way of binding peptides to the surface of gallium nitride (GaN) in a way that keeps the peptides stable even when exposed to water and radiation. The discovery moves researchers one step closer to developing a new range of biosensors for use in medical and biological research applications.

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The Future Of Robotics Is Soft And Practically Indestructible – Redorbit

Fire, snow, water – and being crushed by a car – are no problem for a new “bio-inspired” robot. The science of soft robotics has taken a major leap forward with the production of the first ever “untethered” soft robot that can get up and walk freely, no longer relying on a cord for power or control.

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UK scientists develop super-black material that absorbs 99.96 percent of surface light

A newly produced material is believed to be the “blackest” ever created. Vantablack is a pure carbon coating and absorbs 99.96 percent of incident radiation (solar energy as it hits the material’s surface). Manufacturer Surrey NanoSystems believes that is the highest such figure ever recorded.

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Peering into giant planets from in and out of this world

Scientists for the first time have experimentally re-created the conditions that exist deep inside giant planets.

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Starlite is a miracle material that could change the world – but secret may have gone to the grave with its inventor

It was unveiled on the BBC TV show ‘Tomorrow’s World’ in 1991 during which its British inventor held a Starlite-coated egg up to a blowtorch – and it was still runny inside.