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‘Gyroscope’ molecules form crystal that’s both solid and full of motion

Molecular machines, much smaller than single cells, may one day be able to deliver drugs to kill cancer cells or patrol your body for signs of disease. But many applications of these machines require large arrays of rock-hard moving parts, which would be difficult to build with typical biological structures.

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Nanomachines that drill into cancer cells killing them in just 60 seconds developed by scientists

Nanomachines which can drill into cancer cells, killing them in just 60 seconds, have been developed by scientists. The tiny spinning molecules are driven by light, and spin so quickly that they can burrow their way through cell linings when activated. In one test conducted at Durham University the nanomachines

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Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computing

A study by MIT researchers shows that collections of ultracold molecules can retain the information stored in them for hundreds of times longer than previously achieved in these materials. These clusters might thus serve as “qubits,” the basic building blocks of quantum computers.

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Breakthrough Quantum Cat Experiment Captured on Camera

The paradox of Schrödinger’s cat-in which a quantum cat is both alive and dead at the same time until we check to see which state it’s in-is arguably the most famous example of the bizarre counter-intuitive nature of the quantum world. Now, Stanford physicists have exploited this feature weirdness to make highly detailed movies of the inner machinery of simple iodine molecules.

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Seeing RNA at the nanoscale

MIT researchers have adapted a technique known as expansion microscopy to visualize RNA molecules at high resolution in tissue samples. They have also made the technique easier to use, with off-the-shelf components.

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How You Consist of Trillions of Tiny Machines

Today, driven by ongoing technological innovations, the exploration of the “nanoverse,” as the realm of the minuscule is often termed, continues to gather pace. Paul Falkowski’s new book Life’s Engines: How Microbes Made Earth Habitable focuses on one of the most astonishing discoveries of the twentieth century-that our cells are comprised of a series of highly sophisticated “little engines” or nanomachines that carry out life’s vital functions.