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Harvard study shows the surprising impact of intermittent fasting on the aging process

Countless research studies have shown the benefits of intermittent fasting, and now Harvard scientists have closely examined its impact on the aging process. Intermittent fasting refers to an eating pattern that cycles between periods of fasting and eating. The most common intermittent fasting methods involve daily 16 hour fasts, or fasting for 24 hours, twice …

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Researchers replicated a notorious social experiment that claimed to explain the rise of fascism

Remember that study from psychology class where participants were willing to shock people with excessively high voltage, just because a researcher told them to? Well, a new paper published March 14 just announced that the famous Milgram Experiment has been replicated in Poland over 50 years since its inception in the US. It’s been replicated…

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Cerebrospinal fluid shows promise as autism biomarker

Researchers from the UC Davis MIND Institute, University of North Carolina (UNC) and other institutions have found that altered distribution of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in high-risk infants can predict whether they will develop autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study appears March 6 in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

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Study first to connect stress-associated brain activity with cardiovascular risk

Credit: Tawakol et al, 2017, The LancetA study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISSMS) investigators has linked, for the first time in humans, activity in a stress-sensitive structure within the brain to the risk of subsequent cardiovas

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Artificial Wombs Just Got One Step Closer to Reality

Scientists have sustained human embryos in a petri dish for 13 days, shattering the previous record of nine days. The breakthrough will allow researchers to study early fetal development in unprecedented detail, and brings us one step closer to viable “artificial wombs.” But it’s adding fuel to an already heated ethical debate.

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No link between coffee consumption and common type of irregular heartbeat

There is no association between coffee consumption and an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine. The research includes a meta-analysis of four other studies, making it the largest study its kind, involving nearly 250,000 individuals over the course of 12 years.

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Transcription factor doubling as a structural protein identified in world's first. | Healthinnovations on WordPress.com

Structural proteins perform much like their name suggests, they maintain cell shape and make up connective tissues like cartilage and bone.  Telling a cell biologist that a structural protein is doubling as a transcription factor will not be believed as it’s never been seen before.  Now, researchers at Washington State University, Penn State, the Chinese…

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Transcription factor doubling as a structural protein identified in world’s first. | Healthinnovations on WordPress.com

Structural proteins perform much like their name suggests, they maintain cell shape and make up connective tissues like cartilage and bone.  Telling a cell biologist that a structural protein is doubling as a transcription factor will not be believed as it’s never been seen before.  Now, researchers at Washington State University, Penn State, the Chinese…

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Scientists develop pioneering method to define stages of stem cell reprogramming

In a groundbreaking study that provides scientists with a critical new understanding of stem cell development and its role in disease, UCLA researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research led by Dr. Kathrin Plath, professor of biological chemistry, have established a first-of-its-kind methodology that defines the unique stages by which specialized cells are reprogrammed into stem cells that resemble those found in the embryo.

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First detailed picture of a cancer-related cell enzyme in action on a chromosome unit

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1)-a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer.

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An enzyme and synaptic plasticity

Synapses are ‘dynamic’ things: they can regulate their action in neural processes related to learning, for example, but also as a consequence of diseases. A research team — led by SISSA — has demonstrated the role of a small enzyme in synaptic plasticity. The study has just been published in the journal Nature Communications.

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Simple method turns human skin cells into immune-fighting white blood cells – Salk Institute for Biological Studies

LA JOLLA-For the first time, scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells, soldiers of the immune system that fight infections and invaders. The work, done at the Salk Institute, could let researchers create therapies that introduce into the body new white blood cells capable of attacking diseased or cancerous cells or augmenting immune responses against other disorders.